Barry Trimmer, PhD

Barry Trimmer, PhD

Professor of Biology

 

Education

BA, Natural Science & Zoology, University of Cambridge
PhD, Neurobiology, University of Cambridge
Postdoctoral Training, Harvard Medical School; University of California, Berkely; University of Oregon

Location

Campus: Medford
Office: 200 Boston Avenue
Laboratory: 200 Boston Avenue

Contact Information

Office Phone: 617-627-3924
Laboratory Phone: 617-627-0900
E-mail   Send an e-mail

Links

Research Web Site Lab Research Page
Recent Publications Abstract in PubMed

Graduate Programs

Neuroscience

 

Research Synopsis

We focus on understanding how cell signaling contributes to the functions of the central nervous system (CNS), in particular the mechanisms that mediate information processing and allow appropriate response to sensory input. We use the hawkmoth caterpillar (Manduca sexta), which exhibits complex behavior generated by a (relatively) simple CNS. Most recently, we are studying the functional roles of two transmitters, acetylcholine (ACh) and nitric oxide (NO). Using electrophysiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology we have established that two different families of ACh receptors transduce sensory signals, subsequently encoded by neuron-specific electrical and biochemical changes. In contrast, the neurotransmitter role of NO remains enigmatic.

Lab Members

Jacqueline Clark, PhD Student in Biology  Send an e-mail 
Guy Levy, Postdoctoral Scholar  Send an e-mail 
Naya McCartney, PhD Student in Biology Send an e-mail 
Ritwika Mukherjee, PhD Student in Biology   Send an e-mail  Send an e-mail
Anthony Scibelli, PhD Student in Biology    Send an e-mail 

Apply to the Sackler School

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The priority application deadlines are as follows:

December 1: Basic Science Division PhD Programs

February 15: Building Diversity in Biomedical Sciences

March 31: Post-Baccalaureate Research Program

May 1: Clinical & Translational Science, MS in Pharmacology & Drug Development

June 15: Online Certificate in Fundamentals of Clinical Care Research